GLENROTHES AREA FUTURES GROUP (GAFG)

(The aim of the GAFG is “to ascertain, co-ordinate and express the views of the communities in Glenrothes and surrounding area.”)

The A92 as adjacent to the Glenrothes area

A paper was produced on the above in January 2006 by three of the local community councils and recently up-dated by the new GAFG. The former and the latter have both circulated among Fife officials, Fife councillors and MSP’s, and have received good and positive local and national publicity. The following is a summary.

There are 5 specific points of concern which involve road safety, but also the economy.

1. The Balfarg Junction on the A92 at the Western Avenue. In spite of minor improvements this junction remains a hazard to (a) motorists travelling south who wish to enter Western Avenue, (b) those travelling south FROM Western Avenue and (c) those from Tofthill housing who wish to travel north. While the rules of the road and signings are clear, this is a complicated junction and too many motorists are uncertain of give-ways.

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2. The Cadham Junction on the A92 at the junction of the A92 with Cadham Road. Known but unresolved when the new Tullis Russell roundabout was built, this remains a well-known local hazard in spite of “patching”, especially for those exiting on to the A92 to travel south. Many local motorists from north Glenrothes escape by travelling south via Western Avenue and the Leslie Road to the town centre. Pedestrians and cyclists who wish to travel to Markinch from north Glenrothes, and vice versa, are not catered for at this point of the A92.

3. The single lane stretch of road between the Preston and the new Tullis Russell roundabouts. This is a single lane between two short dual carriageways and two roundabouts, where traffic inevitably must slow down. Logic and safety would suggest the finalising of the dual carriageway process along the whole A92 adjacent to Glenrothes, or a second and parallel road. The large Tullis Russell paper factory is proposing a new biomass energy system which will bring ca. 200 lorries daily to this specific part of the A92 where there is entry to the factory. The same lorries will exit at the Tullis Russell roundabout, again on to the A92 north and south.

Two extensive retail developments are planned for Glenrothes town centre for 2009 - entry is again via the A92, chiefly at the Prestonhall roundabout for both commercial and private vehicles. Some fewer local people will travel outwith Glenrothes to shop, but these retail developments will revolutionsie Glenrothes town centre and attract a considerable number of visitors for shopping.

4. The winding, single lane north of the Tullis Russell roundabout to Balbirnie Mains, where it becomes briefly a dual carriageway. This dangerous stretch has many speed restrictions and warning signs and is that part of the A92 adjacent to Cadham Road, the Tullis Russell roundabout and a car wash, with no safe pedestrian crossing facilities.

5. The whole A92 from Glenrothes to the Tay Bridge. Ideally the A92 from the Forth to the Tay road bridges should be dual carriageway thereby providing a modern traffic situation which is safe and conducive to economic development.

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This paper therefore sets out details of these problems as well as an unarguable case for curing the last of the local A92 problems. There is no doubt that major (re)construction is needed - but no major rethinking since that was done in the 1990’s. The aim is the achievement of safety and operational efficiency, together with local and national economic improvement.

An alternative suggestion is for “a Glenrothes bypass”, which could be from the Cluny junction of the A92 pre-Redhouse roundabout linking with either the Balfarg junction or indeed further north. This would ameliorate the Redhouse problems and resolve the situation of a major trunk road running through the town of Glenrothes.

The problems of this section of the A92 were recognised by government in the 1990’s, and various “patches” have partially succeeded in some improvements - but only partially. Accidents continue unabated and public safety continues to be threatened. Since that time new local and major developments have taken place as well as a national increase in traffic which strengthen the case for this major A92 improvement - e.g. major retail developments within Glenrothes to be served by the local A92, the Tullis Russell biomass energy development. These MUST return this A92 section to the national agenda of the Scottish Parliament and make this a national and immediate priority.

And as well as ensuring public safety such A92 improvements WILL improve the economy of the Glenrothes area, of all Fife Back to A92